…Through the virtue of training, Enlighten both body and soul — Morihei Sensei

Turtle Crawl Olympic Triathlon, Jekyll Island: Race Report

triathlon swimmers ready for ocean swim start at Jekyll Turtle CrawlThis past weekend I raced in my first Jekyll Island Turtle Crawl Triathlon, Olympic distance.  Jekyll is definitely a beautiful setting.  I had looked at this race last year, but scheduling in May is a toughie.  However, with Ironman Florida looming, and between its Gulf Coast ocean swim, and run/bike terrain, Jekyll seemed like a great prep race.

Before going further, let me say this report is tempered by the reality that a man, Christopher Petty, died during or shortly after the swim portion of the race.

We had vacationed in the area earlier in the year, swimming at St. Simons and Jekyll.  I did not have great confidence being able to execute a decent stroke for any real distance in the surf.  However, in the time since, my stroke in the pool has greatly improved, and a good bit has transferred to open water training (in the lake, albeit).

Down and Dirty

Once we got going, this was a fun race.  The volunteers are all super friendly, the locals are great (hard to be a hard-ass living on Jekyll).  There were some organizational glitches and one outright tragedy.  However, I would recommend this race.

Distances:  1500 meter swim, 28 mile bike, 10k run.  With relay, sprint, and 5k- & 10k- only options.

Course:  Point-to-point 1500 meter swim along the Jekyll Island ocean-side coast;
28 mile loop (essentially) bike, one bottle exchange station; 10k out and back run, two water stations.

Registration:  $85, 95, & 105 depending on how early you register, USAT member.  There is a mail-in option. SetUp Events has an unsecured login and registration page.  One lady assured me the payment processing was secured, but I don’t do unsecured logins.

Host:  SetUp Events

Race Results

Weather:   Weather was beautiful.  When I got on the island I heard the water temps were 72ish, that morning, someone said 74.  Regardless, the water was an ideal temperature–Wetsuit legal.  My second race in  my new Xterra john suit.  There was some rain the day before, but that seemed to only enhance the race conditions.

Terrain:

  • Swim–A long walk down the beach to the swim start.  Wave start on the beach, into the surf, hang a right and swim 1500 meters, hang another right and swim out.  Slightly swimming against the current exiting the water.
  • Bike–Pretty flat.  Some slopes and rises, not even rollers.  The issue is the cross- and head-winds.  It was really a cross wind, so on the way back no tail-wind benefit.  Apparently, good Florida training.
  • Run–Virtually same terrain as the ride.  A paved stretch with the beach to your side.  Dappled shade.

Competition:   Mixed bag of super fast guys, and first-timers.  Given the destination angle of the race, there were a good mix of mid-packers and a more than usual dose of relayers.  The relayers tend to skew your perspective on each leg of race.

My results:  Back of the pack swim, mid-pack bike, mid-pack run.  Giving myself a break on this one, as I still had a cold or something, and was racing after working hard all day, getting on the road late, and only catching a couple of hours sleep.

General Impression:   Fun race.  Idyllic setting & conditions.  Some organizational flaws.  Post-race recovery food was virtually non-existent.  There was a food truck selling food.  The Muscle Milk girls were there.

Room for improvement:   I usually don’t have a long list of complaints, however, I think this list is justified.  Regardless, it does not prevent me from recommending the race.

  1. Arriving at my hotel at 1:30am, necessitated early morning packet pick up.  The packet pickup process was terrible.  The volunteers were not empowered to make decisions to move the line faster, and could only process one person at a time off of a single paper registration list.  This took the already stressful transition setup process, and made it far more stressful than necessary by sucking up all the time.
  2. There was no pre-race briefing.  We were informed via email that all the info was available in an online doc, and there would be no pre-race briefing.  There are several issues with this, one immediate on being that pulling up online docs while on the road is not always fool-proof.  The other being that the briefing has a real purpose to inform participants of changes and new issues right before they start.  The briefing is not a check-the-block kind of thing.  Several niggling annoyances could have been avoided with a good pre-race brief right before the start.
  3. No port-a-potties.  One after the race lady told me she saw one, but I saw none during the race, not at transition or anywhere else.
  4. Post race recovery food was utterly lacking.  There was water and Gatorade at the finish line.  Aside from that, I did not see any bananas, bagels or anything else.  The Muscle Milk ladies were there, and that is always nice, but not quite the same.

Tragedy

There is debate about the ocean conditions and the race’s level of organization.  I noticed one boat assisting a swimmer, however I did not see anyone in actual distress.  I did not find the ocean to be too rough to swim, though I could see how it may have been hard for rescue kayaks to track and get to swimmers.  One of my major criticisms is there were some organizational breakdowns.  From my perspective during the race these were mostly annoying, not deadly.  My initial reading of the reports indicate that the actual responders–the rescuers, EMTs, and State Patrol–all responded quickly and appropriately.  It seems that the after-incident notification & reporting to emergency contacts and next of kin, was an issue, something I can imagine.  I have noted some shortcomings, that definitely need to be addressed going forward.  I don’t know to what extent, if at all, they contributed to Mr. Petty’s death, but the devil is in the details.

Triathlon is a dangerous sport, something that racers and organizers need to keep in mind, and be reminded of at all times.  Many are saying the swim should have been cancelled.  I don’t think so.  The water was not unmanageable.  It is an ocean swim after all.  However, but all steps need to be in place, and taken seriously.

The Race

I mentioned earlier that May is a tough month the schedule, however, it is an important month to get in some test races.  This year, on top of the usual soccer schedules, and end of the year school stuff, we are dealing with graduation stuff.  I did not fully understand the impact that graduation stuff was going to have on my schedule in general.  This race was no exception.

I generally, look at my schedule, consult with my wife, and try to shoehorn in personal race, training, and other stuff where I can.  After doing all that, this past weekend seemed to work.  Mother’s Day was the weekend before.  Graduation was several day after.  The regular club soccer season was over, the high school playoffs were done, and the State Cup series would be two weeks out.  But of course, it didn’t work out like that.

Originally, I had planned to leave around noon Friday, get to Jekyll, pick up my packet early, set up my gear, hit the hotel, maybe watch the sunset on the beach.  Actually, at one point, I envisioned making a mini-vacay with my wife out of this, but that evaporated a long time ago.

What actually happened was I was informed the day before that my son’s signing day ceremony would be at 2:30pm in the afternoon (automatic arriving in Jekyll like 10pm), worked all day, pushing to make headway on projects we are already behind on, had to address some domestic logistic issues, and didn’t get on the road until crazy late, arriving at Jekyll at 1:30am in the morning.  I couldn’t fall asleep for another hour, and then started to trying to wake up at 4:45am.

I got to transition about 6am, which should have been plenty of time to get my packet, setup transition, and do everything I needed to.  With the aforementioned glitches, it wasn’t.  Luckily my transition set up is very straight forward, only needing about five minutes to do.

The walk to the swim start is long–be prepared.

Once in the water, I figured swimming in the breakers would be impossible, so I swam out as I could beyond the breakers, and once in the swells, the swimming was manageable.  I saw people struggling in the breakers.  Definitely swim out to the flatter water.  It took a while, but I was able to settle down to a decent free-style.  Alternating sides.  Timing the swells.  Sighting off of the water towers on shore.  Around the last buoy and back to shore.

T1 was uneventful.  I’m working out how to best deploy my homemade Lara bars.  Packaging and carrying during the race is still slightly awkward.  The wetsuit came off super easy this time.  One fitting, one open water swim, and two races later.  Breaking in is key.

The bike was also uneventful.  Beautiful.  A couple of inconsiderate drivers.  After five miles my legs loosened up, and I was able to push my cadence for the remaining 23.  There was a fairly steady cross-wind on the way out.  It was more of three-quarter wind, needing to actually lean into it at times, and forcing me into aero for most of the ride.  Typically, aero is a big issue for me, causing my back to seize up.  However, I had recently adjusted my set up, going for a shorter, more vertical aerobar reach, and had no back issues.

One other big guy and I were hopeful for a tail wind on the way back, but no such thing.  Only less of a cross wind.

In T2 a lady drug her bike through my towel and space, fortunately, not disrupting my gear too much.  I helped her get her bike situated.  Looking at my T2 split, it might have cost me 10 seconds.  And my gear survived.  No biggie.

The run went well.  I kept my stride short, and maintained my form fairly well.  I could feel my hamstrings on the verge of cramping during the last few miles, so I’m confident that I did not hold back.

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10 responses

  1. Great job!

    Tue, 22 May 2012 at 0914

    • Thanks! How’re those new group rides going?

      Thu, 24 May 2012 at 2219

  2. iswimbikerunstrong

    The article says Mr. Petty died of a heart attack. Certainly the HR is higher during a race, and group swim panic is common, but you can’t blame the organizers for that. It is a sport with a lot of older athletes- some I fantastic condition, some not so much. You are right, there are inherent dangers. Make sure you have good life, health, and disability insurance just in case.

    Tue, 22 May 2012 at 1011

    • You’re right.Statistically, the swim is the most dangerous portion for that very reason. It sounds like Mr. Petty had an unknown, underlying condition that reared itself in the water. He also was in shape, and an experienced triathlete. It looks like the responders did everything right. It is a terrible, unfortunate thing, but also an inherent risk.

      Tue, 22 May 2012 at 1613

  3. Greg Waters

    This was my first triathlon. I chose the sprint distance for a beginning into the sport. I am a bad swimmer and was glad to hear from other people that the swim was rougher than most swims. I was in the wave start that Mr. Petty was in. I heard (don’t know if it was him) several people calling for help and saw the boat pull several people from the water as I swam my best and tried not to need assistance. The EMT’s were doing CPR on Mr. Petty right by where I came out of the water. I read that he died later at the hospital. I met my goals of surviving the swim and finishing in under two hours and in the middle of my group. I plan on doing more of these in the future and hope to move up to the Olympic distance. Lots of luck to you and yours.

    Tue, 22 May 2012 at 1759

    • First of all, congratulations on finishing, and finishing motivated to race again. Thank you for commenting on your first hand knowledge. Mr. Petty’s situation is a tragedy, but I am glad to hear confirmation that the first responders were responding appropriately. It is an unfortunate reality of the sport, and terrible for his family.

      Thu, 24 May 2012 at 2215

  4. Pingback: 20 Week Ironman Training: Road to Ironman « Old454 Blog

  5. jenna

    There was tons of food afterwards sponsored by Outback…it was all over by the convention center and just wasn’t marked well (not near the muscle milk and DDonut stand!) We looked for it too (last year we NEVER found it either!).

    Wed, 6 Jun 2012 at 1521

    • Wow. I was relishing in my misery–totally missed that! Thanks for the info…there’s always next year. 🙂

      Wed, 6 Jun 2012 at 2159

  6. Pingback: Race Report: Georgia Veterans Triathlon 2012 « Old454 Blog

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