…Through the virtue of training, Enlighten both body and soul — Morihei Sensei

Archive for March, 2012

Slow Carb Update: 4 Months, 10% BF

I finished the Tour de Pike Century bike ride on Saturday.   Sunday, I took some weight & body fat measurements, and was struck by the result.  Hence this short update on my progress with the Slow Carb diet.

I began this slow-carb diet going into Thanksgiving, of all weird time frames.  Given the one cheat day per week, I simply shifted my chosen Saturday to Thursday for that week, no biggie.  The bigger hurdle was that I had to get on the road the evening of Thanksgiving.  Maintaining a diet on the road is not easy.  Tim Ferris has some helpful ideas.

The other immediate challenge was eliminating sugar from my coffee.  I drink coffee black with sugar.  Taking the sugar out was a HUGE leap for me, particularly in breakfasts meetings at restaurants with bad coffee.  In the end, it wasn’t and isn’t that bad.

The three biggest changes I’ve been able to stay fairly consistent on are a high, mostly protein breakfast right after rising, eating high protein meals for most meals, and eliminating sugar. Eliminating  other white carbs, though now greatly reduced, has been challenging.

The slow-carb model meshes well with my other diet protocols.

I also did a 30 day detox cleanse, which I calculate took five pounds of crud out of my intestines and cell tissues.  However, my body fat readings for that period were extremely screwy.  Two days later they stabilized, around 11-12 percent.

As mentioned (and perhaps revealed in the title), I took my body fat measurements this past Sunday, and registered . . . drum roll . . .  9.9 percent.  All last year,  I did not drop below 10, even coming out of Augusta 70.3 Half Ironman.  Whereas, the sub-10 may be the result of several concurrent protocols–slow carb, ongoing nutrition, detox cleanse, training regimen–The slow carb component is the one aspect I have not done or been on previously.

At any rate, I’m down to my fighting weight (top secret), and below 10% body fat (at last measure).  I’m lifting more, running better, and riding harder than I was going into Augusta last year.  Take it for what it’s worth.

–Jalal

Find me on Twitter — Twitter.com/Old454

As always, your comments are welcomed.

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Chief Tecumseh: Words of Wisdom

“So live your life that the fear of death can never enter your heart. Trouble no one about their religion; respect others in their view, and demand that they respect yours. Love your life, perfect your life, beautify all things in your life. Seek to make your life long and its purpose in the service of your people. Prepare a noble death song for the day when you go over the great divide.

Always give a word or a sign of salute when meeting or passing a friend, even a stranger, when in a lonely place. Show respect to all people and grovel to none.

When you arise in the morning give thanks for the food and for the joy of living. If you see no reason for giving thanks, the fault lies only in yourself. Abuse no one and no thing, for abuse turns the wise ones to fools and robs the spirit of its vision.

When it comes your time to die, be not like those whose hearts are filled with the fear of death, so that when their time comes they weep and pray for a little more time to live their lives over again in a different way. Sing your death song and die like a hero going home.”

~ Chief Tecumseh

I simply present the warrior’s words here.  They speak more eloquently for themselves than any commentary I may have in my mind.

http://www.wisdomcommons.org/wisbits/662-chief-tecumseh-s-words-of-wisdom

Additional Chief Tecumseh quotes

 

This poem was quoted, quite appropriately in the 2012 movie Act of Valor.

The abridged version presented in the movie:

“So live your life that the fear of death can never enter your heart. Trouble no one about their religion; respect others in their view, and demand that they respect yours. Love your life, perfect your life, beautify all things in your life. Seek to make your life long and its purpose in the service of your people.

When it comes your time to die, be not like those whose hearts are filled with the fear of death, so that when their time comes they weep and pray for a little more time to live their lives over again in a different way. Sing your death song and die like a hero going home.”

~ Tecumseh


Tour de Pike 2012

Tour de pike 2012 t-shirtThis past Saturday was my first Tour de Pike Century cycling ride in Concord, Georgia.  The bike ride actually has several mileage options from 8 miles to 10o miles.  I opted for the 33 mile course.  I was hoping to be ready for the century, but circumstances have hindered my training to this point.  The 66 mile option was probably more in line with my training, but schedules in the Spring are super tight.  Alas, 33 it was.

The ride is very nice.  It is a low key start and finish.  The rest stops in each town are nice, with friendly, helpful people.  There is a good selection of refreshments.  Some of the stops have port-a-potties, some real restrooms.

The route splits are well marked, but a decent map is provided for each distance route, just in case.

Terrain is rolling hills, with some longer climbs.  Nothing too severe.  However, the accumulation over miles can take it’s toll, so be prepared.

I had a good opportunity to test out some of my new nutrition strategy & my new water bottle/tool bag setup.  There are a couple of things I still need to sort out, particularly placement of a spare tube & CO2 cartridges, give my new barebones tool bag.

Other Details:

Date:  Saturday, 17 March 2012

Distances:  8, 18, 33, 66 & 100 miles

Times:  Registration open 7am

Ride start 8:30am

Cost:  $25 in advance, $30 after 9 March.  walk-up registration available

Website:   http://www.kiwanispike.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=115&Itemid=129

 

 


Out of the Wild

I walked out of the Woods the other day, drenched, cold and exhilarated.

I spend the better part of this past four-day weekend in the Cohutta Wilderness.  It was my second trip to the Cohutta.  My earlier visit was with the two Princes, and we overnighted on the Chestnut Lead trail, and then hiked a portion of the Conasauga River trail, before breaking camp and heading back.

This time I got to the Mountain rather late in the afternoon, and found the road leading from the intersection of FS 64 and 68 was closed in either direction leading to the trailheads.  So I parked at the gate, and made the two-mile hike to the Tearbritches Trailhead.  My plan was to hike Bald Mountain, overnight, hike to Cowpen Mountain, overnight, and then hike out the third day.  Primary trails would have been Tearbritches and Panther Creek.

The weather forecast for the weekend was not good.  I had considered bringing my dog, who is warrior and always down to go, but thought better of it.  Good choice.  The weatherman essentially called for continuous rain Saturday night, Sunday, and Sunday night.  I packed some medium cold weather gear, my lightweight gortex, my hammock set up with rain-fly, typical extra socks, and trail feed.

I was well into sunset by the time I got to the North side of Bald Mountain.  I found a spot on the North-East side of the ridge and set up.  The rain was to come from the South-West, and I wanted a good wind break on the opposite face.  Another good choice.  That night it did rain, and I could hear the wind howling through the upper canopy coming from the opposite face.  However, there was virtually no wind in my spot.

By the way, I love hammock camping for many reasons.  Among which are:  a)  I can set up on virtually any level terrain, without having to clear any ground,  b) and I can camp leaving no trace, no compacted ground, no tent clearing.

It did rain all night.  It let up just after sunrise, though the fog and mist made for an undramatic sunrise.  Then it started raining again.

I decided to start hiking.  In the rain you’ve a few choices, my option is to load up the heater (my backpack), and stay warm by keeping moving.  Plus I figured the rain would let up at some point, and if it didn’t I could probably make my total distance, pack it in and hike out.

It literally rained all day.

Tearbritches Trail is aptly named.  I thought at first maybe because there were a lot of briars and brambles.  No.  It is because of the phenomenon when you take a big step up or down, and tear out the crotch of your pants.  I didn’t tear out my crotch, but the trail basically descends the entire 4000 feet or so from the top of Bald Mountain to the Conasauga River.  And what trail goes down, must come up . . .

Towards the bottom of Tearbritches, the river crossings begin.  When hiking in the Cohutta, be prepared to get your feet wet.  They’re gonna get wet and cold, so accept it, suck it up, and keep moving.

A right turn along Conasauga River trail brings you to Panther Creek, and a wide river, somewhat treacherous river crossing.  Panther Creek trail leads off Southwest.

Panther Creek trail leads off at a fairly tolerable elevation, but soon becomes a literal rock scramble.  Treacherous for the inexperience hiker.  Panther Creek tumbles down several very nice falls, and eventually to a dramatic cascade down a sheer rock face.

I lost the trail in the rain, and found myself (almost) lost.  I used my map and terrain navigation skills to climb several ridges and eventually linked back up with the East Cowpens trail.  At this point it was late, I was cold and freezing.  East Cowpens lead back to FS 64 where I made the four mile return hike to my truck.  I started sleeting.  I don’t think I was ever as glad to see my truck, through the mist, in the sleet, in the fading light.